here we go again 2

Discussion of the end of the world brought about by ultra high energy colliders.
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chelle
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Re: here we go again 2

Post by chelle » Wed Jan 06, 2016 12:07 am

mfb wrote:… your pet crackpot theory is just annoying.
Can't see what's annoying about raising the question if waves can travel through the Higgs Field and shake nuclei apart … is there any conductivity? It would be similar like saying that electro magnetic waves are annoying or the ripples on a lake … these phenomena simply are. Seems like you have some personal issues for not liking this question, what's up with that? Waves are a neutral thing that shows up all through nature can't see why it wouldn't happen in the Higgs Field.
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mfb
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Re: here we go again 2

Post by mfb » Tue Jan 26, 2016 12:20 pm

Those waves would be Higgs bosons, in the same way electromagnetic waves can be described with photons and sound in solids with phonons and so on. We know the extremely short lifetime of Higgs bosons.

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chelle
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Re: here we go again 2

Post by chelle » Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:44 pm

mfb wrote:Those waves would be Higgs bosons … 
More like breaking waves than, since there's a collapse (bang/particle) that emerges out of it?

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mfb wrote:… We know the extremely short lifetime of Higgs bosons.
Do 'we' know this from experience or from predictions?

Ok, so currently these *sparks* dim out within the distance of an Atom, what if we start increasing energies and velocities, will these 'breaking waves' erupt further and further from the collision center; and will this be a linear or exponential growth … because that's how the Higgs Field conducts these waves and let's them transform into a particle?

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mfb
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Re: here we go again 2

Post by mfb » Tue Mar 01, 2016 8:37 pm

chelle wrote:
mfb wrote:Those waves would be Higgs bosons … 
More like breaking waves than, since there's a collapse (bang/particle) that emerges out of it?
They are not gravity waves on the surface of an ocean, that analogy does not make sense.
chelle wrote:
mfb wrote:… We know the extremely short lifetime of Higgs bosons.
Do 'we' know this from experience or from predictions?
Both.
Ok, so currently these *sparks* dim out within the distance of an Atom, what if we start increasing energies and velocities, will these 'breaking waves' erupt further and further from the collision center; and will this be a linear or exponential growth … because that's how the Higgs Field conducts these waves and let's them transform into a particle?
The Higgs boson has a lifetime of about 10^(-22) seconds, the LHC at full luminosity and energy produces about one Higgs boson every 2 seconds. With the high-luminosity upgrade, that might increase to 3.5 per second. In addition, those collisions happen over a volume of ~50µm x 50µm x 5cm, while the Higgs decays before it travels more than a few 10^(-14) meters. You'll never get two Higgs bosons to come together.

And where is the point at all? Every nucleus of oxygen has a nucleus with 8 protons and 8 neutrons (or 24 up- and 24 down-valence quarks, and even more sea quarks and gluons). Do you fear oxygen atoms just because multiple particles of the same type are at the same place?

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chelle
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Re: here we go again 2

Post by chelle » Tue Mar 01, 2016 9:04 pm

Hey great to see you show up again. :mrgreen:
mfb wrote:
chelle wrote:
mfb wrote:Those waves would be Higgs bosons … 
More like breaking waves than, since there's a collapse (bang/particle) that emerges out of it?
They are not gravity waves on the surface of an ocean, that analogy does not make sense.
Of course that doesn't make sense, I was talking about waves in the Higgs Field.
mfb wrote:
chelle wrote:
mfb wrote:… We know the extremely short lifetime of Higgs bosons.
Do 'we' know this from experience or from predictions?
Both.
Ok.

mfb wrote:
Ok, so currently these *sparks* dim out within the distance of an Atom, what if we start increasing energies and velocities, will these 'breaking waves' erupt further and further from the collision center; and will this be a linear or exponential growth … because that's how the Higgs Field conducts these waves and let's them transform into a particle?
The Higgs boson has a lifetime of about 10^(-22) seconds, the LHC at full luminosity and energy produces about one Higgs boson every 2 seconds. With the high-luminosity upgrade, that might increase to 3.5 per second. In addition, those collisions happen over a volume of ~50µm x 50µm x 5cm, while the Higgs decays before it travels more than a few 10^(-14) meters. You'll never get two Higgs bosons to come together.

And where is the point at all? Every nucleus of oxygen has a nucleus with 8 protons and 8 neutrons (or 24 up- and 24 down-valence quarks, and even more sea quarks and gluons). Do you fear oxygen atoms just because multiple particles of the same type are at the same place?
No, I’m just curious/worried that the generated ripples in the Higgs Field that create the Higgs Boson, would spread out and collide with with nuclei of the material surrounding the collision spot, and that these collisions between ripples and nuclei will disrupt the inner mechanics of those nuclei, and make them split into pieces. Similar to how the detonation of a chemical explosion in an atom bomb ignites the chain reaction of fission of uranium or plutonium in that nuclear bomb. Ripples that shake things apart.
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